Taking service to the next level

A cursory glance at the Net Promoter Scores for the major UK telecoms carriers shows that their level of service leaves a lot to be desired. Three and Tesco Mobile currently sit “top” of the list with an NPS score of 27, whereas O2, Virgin Mobile and EE could not even achieve a double-digit score.

It is worth noting that these scores are for B2C businesses. But when providing B2B communications solutions, one must take into account the fact that customer satisfaction in the telecommunications industry is generally low. No organisation in the sector can rest on its laurels and must strive to deliver an excellent customer experience at all times.

It is in this context that Gamma strives to deliver the highest quality customer service in the telecoms industry. According to Andy Morris, Managing Director of Service and Operations at Gamma, the need for a superlative buyer experience is obvious. “Effective customer service is the thing most businesses look for in a communications provider,” he says, “with the possible exception of reliability.”

With this in mind, Gamma is investing significantly in providing the best experience for customers, building on a solid foundation of long-held principles.

Many businesses will be tempted to stay with their existing telecoms provider for convenience, but may not realise that they are missing out on improved cost­efficiency and productivity gains by switching to a new provider.

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Understanding the client

Success comes with having a firm grasp of customer requirements. Deep insight into the unique challenges that each business is trying to overcome has helped Gamma develop specific communications solutions.

“A good service offer comprises a number of components,” says Andy Morris, “but the trick is to deliver the services that are aligned to what the buyer is trying to achieve.”

Getting under the skin of the purchaser is integral, Morris argues, “…because you can present them with a solution set that is tailor made”. He adds, “It might sound painfully obvious, but selling a business something they do not want or need is not endearing!”

Being there for when things go wrong

According to Morris, the true test of customer service comes not when things go right, but when they go wrong. Gamma provides critical services to organisations, so it’s crucial to be aware of the risks involved if these are not available.

“Things won’t always go as they should,” he says. “But if things go wrong during deployment, or when the service is live, we are very clear about how we will fix things and the timeframe we will work to.”

This is why the support staff that serve Gamma customers are the same people who resolve the issues. If a problem is encountered, it isn’t delegated to a different team or passed through the organisation, it is dealt with by the manager accountable for that area, armed with the right tools to be able to resolve the problem.

“We take complaints and feedback very seriously,” says Andy Morris. “Our clients appreciate this and they know that we are open about what we will do to improve.”

A laser-like focus on service

When Gamma started in 2001, service was the main differentiator between the company and its competitors. It was the only way to stand out from the crowd.

“Our continued success,” Andy Morris argues, “is due to the fact that we have retained that fundamental commitment to service, even as our products have become differentiators in themselves.”

And as Gamma continues to grow, investing in customer service remains a top priority. As does maintaining an open dialogue with customers and letting their evolving needs define the company’s service offering.

“Helping businesses help themselves is a key objective for Gamma,” says Morris, “and one that our customers are fully engaged in helping us to develop.”

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24 November 2016 | Cem Ahmet

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The views in this article are the personal views of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by Gamma.